Dehydration means your body loses more fluids than you take in. If it isn’t treated it can get worse and become a serious problem.

Check if you’re dehydrated

Symptoms of dehydration in adults and children include:

  • feeling thirsty
  • dark yellow and strong smelling pee
  • feeling dizzy or lightheaded
  • feeling tired
  • dry mouth, lips and eyes
  • peeing little, and fewer than 4 times a day

Dehydration can happen more easily if you have:

  • diabetes
  • vomiting or diarrhoea
  • been in the sun too long (heatstroke)
  • drunk too much alcohol
  • sweated too much after exercising
  • a high temperature of 38C or more
  • been taking medicines that make you pee more (diuretics)

How you can reduce the risk of dehydration

A pharmacist can help with dehydration

If you’re being sick or have diarrhoea and are losing too much fluid, you need to put back the sugar, salts and minerals that your body has lost.

Your pharmacist can recommend oral rehydration sachets. These are powders that you mix with water and then drink.

Ask your pharmacist which ones are right for you or your child.

See a GP if:

  • your symptoms don’t improve with treatment

Under-5s with dehydration

The under-5s should get plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration.

It’s quite common for young children to become dehydrated. It can be serious if it’s not dealt with quickly.